Second Sunday of Lent – The Transfiguration

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice.

 

Pope Francis’ words for today:

The Transfiguration of Christ is remembered on the Second Sunday of Lent, it shows us the Christian perspective of suffering. Suffering is not sadomasochism: it is a necessary but transitory passage. The point of arrival to which we are called is luminous like the face of Christ transfigured: in Him is salvation, beatitude, light and the boundless love of God. By revealing His glory in this way, Jesus ensures that the cross, trials, the difficulties with which we struggle, are resolved and overcome in Easter. Thus this Lent, let us also go up the mountain with Jesus! But in what way? With prayer. Let us climb the mountain with prayer: silent prayer, the prayer of the heart, a prayer that always seeks the Lord. Let us pause for some time in reflection a little each day, let us fix our inner gaze on His countenance and allow His light to permeate us and shine in our life.

 

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

 

 

This week’s newsletter can be found here.

First Sunday of Lent – Jesus is tempted in the desert

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice.

 

Pope Francis reminds us that:

On this First Sunday of Lent, the Gospel recalls the themes of temptation, conversion and the Good News. Mark the Evangelist writes: “The Spirit immediately drove Jesus out into the wilderness. And he was in the wilderness forty days, tempted by Satan” (cf. Mk 1:12-13). Jesus goes into the desert to prepare Himself for His mission in the world. For us too, Lent is a time of spiritual “contest”, of spiritual struggle: we are called to confront the Evil One through prayer in order to be able, with God’s help, to overcome him in our daily life. We know that evil unfortunately is at work in our existence and around us, where there is violence, rejection of the other, closure, war, injustice. These are all works of the Evil One. Immediately following the temptations in the desert, Jesus begins to preach the Gospel, that is, the Good News. And this Good News demands our conversion — every single day — and the Church invites us to pray for this. In fact, we are never sufficiently orientated towards God and we must continually direct our minds and our hearts towards Him.

 

May we use these weeks of Lent as a time of blessing as we set aside our own comfort and time and offer it freely to the Lord.

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

 

This week’s newsletter can be found here.

 

Sixth Sunday of Ordinary Time – The leprosy left the man at once, and he was cured

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice.

 

In today’s Gospel we hear Jesus healing a man with leprosy. The Law of Moses provided for the examination of skin diseases by the priests, and if leprosy was identified, the person was declared unclean. People with leprosy lived in isolation from the community. They were instructed to rip their clothes and to announce their presence with loud cries when moving in the community. If the sores of leprosy healed, the Law of Moses provided a purification rite that permitted the person to return to the community.

 

In today’s Gospel, the man with leprosy takes the initiative, approaching Jesus and asking for healing. In doing so, the leper violated the religious customs of the day by approaching a person who was clean. His request to Jesus can be interpreted as a courageous and daring act. The confidence of the leper in Jesus’ ability to heal him is evident in the words of his request. But his words can also be read as a challenge to Jesus, asking just how far Jesus was willing to extend himself in order to heal someone. While healing the man, Jesus touched him, which also violated established social norms. This is an important sign of the depth of Jesus’ compassion for the man.

 

Mark’s Gospel tells us that after this healing, it became difficult for Jesus to travel freely. Mark says that Jesus’ movement was hampered by his popularity. Even when Jesus was in deserted places, people sought him out in search of his healing.

 

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

 

 

This week’s newsletter can be found here.

Fifth Sunday of Ordinary Time – Jesus heals Simon’s Mother-in-Law

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice.

 

Today’s Gospel continues the picture of Jesus’ ministry: preaching, curing the sick, driving out demons, and then moving on to continue this work in another place. Jesus cured Simon’s mother-in-law, and she immediately began to serve Jesus and his disciples. Jesus also cured many others who were brought to him.

 

Jesus’ compassion and healing of the sick is a sign of the Kingdom of God. The Church continues to extend Christ’s healing presence to others in its ministry to the sick, something that is so important for us all at this time of pandemic. The Church continues to pray for spiritual and physical healing, forgiveness of sins, and comfort for those who are suffering from illness and those who care for them.

 

In today’s Gospel we also notice the importance of prayer in Jesus’ daily life. Jesus rose early in the morning, removed himself from the crowds, and went to a deserted place to pray. When the disciples found him, he told them that it was time to move on. We believe that in his prayers Jesus found guidance and direction from God. We also bring our decision-making to God in prayer, asking for his guidance and direction in our lives.

 

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

 

 

This week’s newsletter can be found here.

Fourth Sunday of Ordinary Time – Jesus taught them with authority

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice.

 

Today’s Gospel continues the reading from St. Mark’s Gospel and describes what some believe was likely to have been a typical day in Jesus’ life and ministry. Jesus teaches in the synagogue on the Sabbath. St. Mark reports that the people respond to Jesus’ teaching with astonishment, noting Jesus’ authority and contrasting it with the scribes.

 

The power of Jesus confirms the authority of His teaching by his expulsion of the unclean spirit. He does not just speak with words, but he takes action. In this way, He manifests God’s plan with words and with the power of His deeds. In the Gospel in fact, we see that in His earthly mission, Jesus reveals the love of God both through preaching and through countless gestures of attention and aid to the sick, the needy, children and sinners. Jesus is our Teacher, powerful in word and deed. Jesus imparts to us all the light that illuminates the sometimes dark paths of our lives. He also transmits to us the necessary strength to overcome difficulties, trials and temptations. Let us consider what a great grace it is for us to have known this God who is so powerful and so good! A teacher and a friend who shows us the path and takes care of us especially when we are in need.

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

 

This week’s newsletter can be found here.

The Third Sunday of Ordinary Time – The Sunday of the Word of God.

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice.

 

Pope Francis instituted ‘The Sunday of the Word of God’ to be held every year on the third Sunday of Ordinary Time, with the Motu proprio “Aperuit illis’ issued on September 30th 2019. It is well worth a read, or re-read, to remind ourselves of the importance of the Word of God in our lives as Christians.

 

Recently, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments released a note on the topic of the Sunday of the Word of God, signed by the prefect, Cardinal Robert Sarah. It explains that the Sunday of the Word of God is a means to help people “reawaken an awareness of the importance of Sacred Scripture for our lives as believers, beginning with its resonance in the Liturgy which places us in living and permanent dialogue with God.”

 

The note points out that “through the proclaimed Biblical readings in the Liturgy, God speaks to His people and Christ Himself proclaims His Gospel.” It indicates that “One of the ritual possibilities suitable for this Sunday could be the entrance procession with the Book of the Gospels or simply placing the Book of the Gospels on the altar.”

 

Today, during Mass, Father Dwayne, will bless the Bibles and other books of Scripture we have at home. As Mass is live steamed not in person, you are invited to ensure you have your Bibles or books of Scripture with you at the television, computer, tablet or phone, via which you attend Mass online.

 

Today’s gospel is the beginning of the Gospel of St. Mark from which we shall read for much of Year B. In the gospel we hear Jesus’ pronouncement of the kingdom as a call to repentance. Jesus begins the time of fulfilment; the Kingdom of God is already here. This will be demonstrated again and again, both in Jesus’ words and in the actions that follow. Jesus’ healings and forgiveness of sins are signs of the Kingdom of God that he announces in his teaching. Are we ready to listen to the Word of God and make it our home as we come to know Jesus more fully?

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

 

 

This week’s newsletter can be found here.

Come Follow Me

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice.

 

This Sunday, the Church begins Ordinary Time with the readings of Year B of the three-year cycle. Year B is often called the Year of Mark, as Mark is the Gospel read most frequently during the year, but as Mark’s is the shortest of the first three Gospels, this year we also find readings from St. John’s Gospel interspersed in the cycle of readings. Today’s Gospel, John 1:35-42, is an example of this.

 

Today’s reading from the Gospel builds on last week’s celebration of the Baptism of Jesus, when having been baptised, Jesus begins to gather followers. The first two followers, Andrew and another man, were followers of John the Baptist. After hearing John’s testimony, they became followers of Jesus. During their time with Jesus, the details of which are not specified, Andrew and the other follower came to believe that Jesus is the Messiah. Andrew then brings his brother, Simon, to Jesus. Immediately, Jesus gave Simon a new name, calling him Peter, which means “rock” in Greek. The gospel shows us Jesus seeks out individuals and calls them to be his followers, as we hear them being called, we are asked to listen to the Lord calling us to follow Him and stay with Him in faith.

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

 

This week’s newsletter can be found here.

The Baptism of the Lord

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice.

 

Today the Church celebrates the Feast of the Baptism of Our Lord. This brings to an end the season of Christmas. The Church recalls Our Lord’s second manifestation or epiphany, which occurred on the occasion of His Baptism in the Jordan. Jesus descended into the River to sanctify its waters and to give them the power to beget sons of God. The event takes on the importance of a second creation in which the entire Trinity intervenes. In the Eastern Church, this feast is called Theophany because, at the Baptism of Christ in the River Jordan, God appeared in three persons. The Baptism of John was a sort of sacramental preparatory for the Baptism of Christ. It moved men to sentiments of repentance and induced them to confess their sins. Christ did not need the baptism of John. Although He appeared in the “substance of our flesh” and was recognised “outwardly like unto ourselves”, He was absolutely sinless and impeccable. He conferred upon the water the power of the true Baptism which would remove all the sins of the world: “Behold the Lamb of God, behold Him Who takes away the sin of the world”.

 

Many of the incidents, which accompanied Christ’s Baptism, are symbolic of what happened at our Baptism. At Christ’s Baptism the Holy Spirit descended upon Him; at our Baptism the Trinity took its abode in our soul. At His Baptism Christ was proclaimed the “Beloved Son” of the Father; at our Baptism we become the Sons and Daughters of God. At Christ’s Baptism the heavens were opened; at our Baptism heaven was opened to us.

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

 

This week’s newsletter can be found here.

Second Sunday of Christmas

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice.

 

The readings for this Sunday move from the action of the birth of Jesus and of the Holy Family in their journey into Egypt and become more reflective. What does this birth mean? The Gospel for the day, the Prologue to St. John’s Gospel, is a deep reflection on the mystery of the Incarnation. But do not be put off by any potential complexity. It is a simple statement of faith in which we should all join. In verse 1, we hear that the Word of God which was made flesh had His beginnings with God before creation. In verses 2 to 5, we hear the story of creation, understood as an ongoing process of which Jesus is the fulfilment. In verses 6 to 8, we hear the call and the mission of St. John the Baptist and recognise in him the vocation of all the followers of Jesus. In verses 9 to 14, St. John presents the Incarnation as a remarkable, a strange mystery that the One who made and sustains humanity is rejected by this same humanity. In verses 16 to 18, we are invited to benefit from the grace of the Incarnation. Cardinal St. John Henry Newman said: “Lord, we thank you for the deep moments of Bible reading when we knew that we were in the presence of the Word which existed from the beginning before time began, which was with You before You created the world, which was truly divine, with You from the beginning, and which was made flesh and was living among us.” This sums up the invitation of this Sunday, that we stand in awe at the great things which God has done for us in sending His Son to be one of us in all things but sin.

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

This week’s newsletter can be found here.

Holy Family Sunday

Due to the Alert Level Four in place for the whole of Wales with a very high risk of infection by the new variant of Covid-19 and the ‘at risk’ profile of many of our parishioners Mass will be live streamed only from St. Teilo’s until further notice. An update will be provided next weekend.

 

Today the Church celebrates the Feast of the Holy Family. This celebration takes place on the Sunday within the octave of Christmas bringing our thoughts to our own families as well as the family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph. The Gospel for today is taken from the Gospel according to Luke and describes the presentation of the child Jesus in the Temple.

 

The Gospel alludes to several aspects of the Law of Moses: circumcision, the dedication of the firstborn son to the Lord, and the purification of a woman after childbirth. According to the Law of Moses as presented in the Book of Leviticus, a woman was considered ritually unclean during her menstrual period and for a prescribed period of time following the birth of a child. After the birth of a son, a woman was considered ritually unclean for 40 days. After the birth of a daughter, a woman was considered unclean for 80 days. In order to be restored to ritual purity, a Jewish woman performed the appropriate rites of purification and made the prescribed ritual offering.

 

Today’s Gospel notes that Jesus was circumcised on the eighth day after his birth, in accordance with the Mosaic Law. At that time, he was called Jesus, the name he was given by the angel Gabriel. On the 40th day after Jesus’ birth, Mary performed the appropriate purification rites and made her offering at the Temple. Although the Law of Moses required an offering of a lamb, those who could not afford a lamb could substitute two turtledoves or two pigeons. In this scene, Luke identifies Joseph and Mary as being poor, and indeed throughout Luke’s Gospel, Jesus will show special concern for the poor.

 

Another Jewish rite referenced in this Gospel is the dedication of the firstborn son to the Lord. In remembrance of the feast of Passover, when the firstborn children of the Israelites in Egypt were saved from death, the Law of Moses prescribed that all firstborn males of Israel should be consecrated to the Lord. In this tradition, Mary and Joseph present the infant Jesus in the Temple in Jerusalem.

 

In Jerusalem, Luke reports that Mary and Joseph encounter two devout Jews, Simeon and Anna, who recognize the infant Jesus as the fulfilment of Israel’s hope for redemption. In Simeon’s words we find a prediction of Mary’s witnessing of Jesus’ death on the cross. The Canticle of Simeon, also called by its Latin name, Nunc Dimitis, is prayed at night prayer, or compline, each day during the Liturgy of the Hours. As we come to honour the Holy Family and pray for our own families, perhaps we can make Simeon’s prayer our own as we rejoice to see the salvation of God:

At last, all-powerful Master,

you give leave to your servant

to go in peace, according to your promise.

 

For my eyes have seen your salvation

which you have prepared for all nations,

the light to enlighten the Gentiles

and give glory to Israel, your people.

 

Mass today will be at 10.00am and you are welcome to join us online.

There is no newsletter this week, please continue to use last week’s double edition